SCHT Lab


Completed Research Projects

Research Study of Patient Experiences with Cavernous Malformation/Cavernous Angioma

This study was an online survey of adults with a confirmed diagnosis of cavernous malformation. Research participants answered questions about many different aspects of their lives, including physical and mental health, experiences with the medical system and medical providers, ability/disability in a variety of domains, history of stressful/traumatic experiences, and aspects of the social environment like social support and work. A donation of $5 CAD was made to Angioma Alliance (Angioma Alliance Canada for Canadian participants) for each eligible person who participated in the study. This project was approved on ethical grounds by the University of Regina Research Ethics Board. Below are some of our initial findings from this research study. As we continue to analyze data and present the findings at conferences and in academic papers, we will add links to those papers here.


Patient Experiences with Cavernous Malformation A survey conducted by Bridget Klest, PhD, and the Social Context, Health, and Trauma Lab University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Klest, B. (2014). Lifetime Trauma Exposure, Healthcare Relationships, and Health. Poster presented at the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Conference, Miami, Fl. November 6-8, 2014.

Klest, B. & Tamaian, A. (2014). Medical misdiagnosis exacerbates posttraumatic symptoms. Poster presented at the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Conference, Miami, Fl. November 6-8, 2014.


Regina's Student Run Health Clinic: Evaluation of Client Needs and Volunteer Experiences

Christina Mutschler completed her honours thesis in spring 2014 under the supervision of Bridget Klest. Her thesis project evaluated clients and volunteers who attend the student run health clinic in North Central Regina (SEARCH). Her results found that the community of North Central Regina benefits from the health clinic in a variety of ways including the health care they recieve, the free lunch that is provided, as well as the positive social environment the clinic offers. Clients stated that they are able to share and express their culture which is unlike other clinics. Results also found that student volunteers benefit from working with the North Central population as they began to understand the barriers that some people face in receiving health care. Additionally results to the study can be found here.



Institutional Betrayal in the Medical System

This was a two-part research project designed to investigate feelings of betrayal in the medical system and to create a questionnaire that will reliably capture instances and feelings of betrayal. This project was approved on ethical grounds by the University of Regina Ethics Board. Study 1 investigated experiences that may lead to feelings of institutional betrayal in the Canadian medical system. Participants (n = 14) completed an online survey that investigated such instances. Each participant received a $20 gift certificate as compensation for completing the study. Upon analyzing the data from study 1, a questionnaire was created to measure institutional betrayal in the medical system (i.e., Institutional Betrayal in the Medical System Questionnaire; IBQ-MS – see attachment below).

In study 2, participants with chronic medical conditions (n = 352) completed an online survey that assessed demographics, exposure to trauma, general trust, doctor trust, healthcare relationships, patient-physician communication, levels of dissociation, institutional betrayal in the medical system, and various mental health variables (depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms). Results demonstrated that the IBQ-MS is comprised of 3 institutional betrayal factors: negative healthcare experiences, cognitive-affective reactions, and systemic responses to these experiences. In addition, institutional betrayal predicted poorer mental health functioning even after controlling for demographic variables such as income and education, and for previous traumatic experiences. The results of this research project may assist in improving patient care and well-being within the Canadian medical system. Below are some of our initial findings from these studies. As we continue to analyze data and present the findings at conferences and in academic papers, we will add links to those papers here.

Tamaian, A., & Klest, B. (2015). Patient experiences of institutional betrayal in the Canadian medical system. In B. Klest (Chair), Institutional betrayal and health. Symposium in the Annual American Psychological Association Convention, Toronto, ON.

Tamaian, A., & Klest, B. (2015). Institutional betrayal in the medical system predicts symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder in a sample of patients with chronic medical conditions. Poster presented to the Annual International Society for Traumatic Stress Conference, New Orleans, LA. Nov 4-7, 2015

Institutional Betrayal in the Medical System Questionnaire (IBQ-MS)

Mutschler, C., Tamaian, A., & Klest, B. (2015). The effects of adverse childhood experiences and childhood trauma on adult healthcare relationships in a sample of patients with chronic medical conditions. Poster presented to the Annual International Society for Traumatic Stress Conference, New Orleans, LA. Nov 4-7, 2015